Andorid technology

android-techThe world is becoming connected, in the most basic form of handheld communication and sharing. Phones are becoming like computers, and soon we might use them for all kinds of functions. Management of businesses could even be carried out using a moderately sized handheld computer, with plans and functions being executed from a beach far away. This is where android technology is taking us, and it’s looking good

Android is a Linux-based operating system designed primarily for touchscreen mobile devices such as smartphones and tablet computers. Initially developed by Android, Inc., which Google backed financially and later purchased in 2005, Android was unveiled in 2007 along with the founding of the Open Handset Alliance: a consortium of hardware, software, and telecommunication companies devoted to advancing open standards for mobile devices. The first Android-powered phone was sold in October 2008.

Google purchased Android Inc., a 22-month-old Palo Alto, California, startup in July 2005. Android Inc. was co-founded by Andy Rubin, maker of mobile device Danger Inc.™ The purchase was key in Google’s move into the wireless technology market. In 2008, Google introduced the HTC Dream™ as the first marketed phone to use Android™ technology. Since that time, this platform use has expanded to other smart phones, tablet computers, E-readers, netbooks, and other devices.

One of the key differences between Android™ technology and other smart phone systems is that it is open for modification. This gives vendors the opportunity to change and enhance their products based on their own preferences. This has created many versions of Android™ phones, which can vary by vendor, as well as a range of other devices that use this platform. In 2011, Google introduced a new arena for Android™ when it announced plans to launch Android@Home, a network that could allow users to automate and control home appliances.

Android is an exciting platform for consumers and developers. It is the philosophical opposite of the iPhone in many ways. Where the iPhone tries to create the best user experience by restricting hardware and software standards, Android tries to insure it by opening up as much of the operating system as possible.

This is both good and bad. Fragmented versions of Android may provide a unique user experience, but they also mean fewer users per variation. That means it’s harder to support for app developers, accessory makers, and technology writers (ahem). Because each Android upgrade must be modified for the specific hardware and user interface upgrades of each device, that also means it takes longer for modified Android phones to receive updates.

Fragmentation issues aside, Android is a robust platform that boasts some of the fastest and most amazing phones and tablets on the market.