Ichiro Suzuki Leaves Game with Possible Injury After Being Hit in Head by Pitch

Seattle Mariners outfielder Ichiro Suzuki was forced to leave a minor league game Friday after he was hit in the head by a pitch. 

The Seattle Times' Ryan Divish relayed a video of the at-bat: 

The 44-year-old was helped up and walked off the field under his own power: 

The Mariners signed Ichiro to a one-year, $750,000 contract on March 7, but he's been slowed by a calf injury throughout spring training. 

The 10-time All-Star was pulled from a game against the San Francisco Giants with tightness in his right calf muscle, and he only recently returned to action as he prepares for his 18th MLB season. 

If healthy, Ichiro is expected to play regularly until Ben Gamel returns from an oblique injury that's expected to sideline him anywhere from four to six weeks. 

"We feel Ichiro can step in and play regularly in left field. He's almost platoon-immune," general manager Jerry Dipoto said on the Wheelhouse podcast, per MLB.com's Greg Johns. "In fact, he has reverse splits and handles left-handed pitchers better. The worst-case scenario for us is Ben Gamel returns a month later than expected, but we have Ichiro to get us through."

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Ichiro Suzuki Leaves Game with Possible Injury After Being Hit in Head by Pitch

Seattle Mariners outfielder Ichiro Suzuki was forced to leave a minor league game Friday after he was hit in the head by a pitch. 

The Seattle Times' Ryan Divish relayed a video of the at-bat: 

The 44-year-old was helped up and walked off the field under his own power: 

The Mariners signed Ichiro to a one-year, $750,000 contract on March 7, but he's been slowed by a calf injury throughout spring training. 

The 10-time All-Star was pulled from a game against the San Francisco Giants with tightness in his right calf muscle, and he only recently returned to action as he prepares for his 18th MLB season. 

If healthy, Ichiro is expected to play regularly until Ben Gamel returns from an oblique injury that's expected to sideline him anywhere from four to six weeks. 

"We feel Ichiro can step in and play regularly in left field. He's almost platoon-immune," general manager Jerry Dipoto said on the Wheelhouse podcast, per MLB.com's Greg Johns. "In fact, he has reverse splits and handles left-handed pitchers better. The worst-case scenario for us is Ben Gamel returns a month later than expected, but we have Ichiro to get us through."

Read more MLB news on BleacherReport.com

Minor League Baseball Players to Lose Minimum Wage Rights Under Spending Bill

Minor league baseball players may soon lose their minimum wage rights as part of Congress' upcoming vote on a $1.3 billion spending package. 

According to Forbes' Maury Brown, a provision listed as the "Save America's Pastime Act" on page 1,967 of the 2,232-page bill proposes amending the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 to include the following: 

[A]ny employee employed to play baseball who is compensated pursuant to a contract that provides for a weekly salary for services performed during the league’s championship season (but not on spring training or the off season) at a rate that is not less than a weekly salary equal to the minimum wage under section 6(a) for a workweek of 40 hours, irrespective of the number of hours the employee devotes to baseball related activities.

The "Save America's Pastime Act" was first introduced as a bill in 2016 but did not generate the momentum necessary to become law. 

Since then, Major League Baseball has reportedly "paid lobbyists hundreds of thousands of dollars to write a specific exemption into the law," according to the Washington Post's Mike DeBonis

If the bill ultimately passes, minor league clubs will be able to pay their players as little as $1,100 a month, which works out to $275 a week.

By comparison, the federal minimum wage sits at $7.25 an hour. Extrapolated over a 40-hour work week, that equals $1,160 per month. 

The spending bill is scheduled to be voted on in its entirety on Friday. It needs to pass in order for the federal government to avoid another shutdown. 

Read more MLB news on BleacherReport.com

Minor League Baseball Players to Lose Minimum Wage Rights Under Spending Bill

Minor league baseball players may soon lose their minimum wage rights as part of Congress' upcoming vote on a $1.3 billion spending package. 

According to Forbes' Maury Brown, a provision listed as the "Save America's Pastime Act" on page 1,967 of the 2,232-page bill proposes amending the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 to include the following: 

[A]ny employee employed to play baseball who is compensated pursuant to a contract that provides for a weekly salary for services performed during the league’s championship season (but not on spring training or the off season) at a rate that is not less than a weekly salary equal to the minimum wage under section 6(a) for a workweek of 40 hours, irrespective of the number of hours the employee devotes to baseball related activities.

The "Save America's Pastime Act" was first introduced as a bill in 2016 but did not generate the momentum necessary to become law. 

Since then, Major League Baseball has reportedly "paid lobbyists hundreds of thousands of dollars to write a specific exemption into the law," according to the Washington Post's Mike DeBonis

If the bill ultimately passes, minor league clubs will be able to pay their players as little as $1,100 a month, which works out to $275 a week.

By comparison, the federal minimum wage sits at $7.25 an hour. Extrapolated over a 40-hour work week, that equals $1,160 per month. 

The spending bill is scheduled to be voted on in its entirety on Friday. It needs to pass in order for the federal government to avoid another shutdown. 

Read more MLB news on BleacherReport.com

Carlos Carrasco Exits Game vs. Royals with Foot Injury from Line Drive

Cleveland Indians ace Carlos Carrasco had his spring training interrupted Wednesday when he suffered a foot injury against the Kansas City Royals. 

According to MLB.com's Jordan Bastian, Carrasco left the game with trainers after being hit by a comebacker off the bat of Royals third baseman Cheslor Cuthbert. 

Carrasco's injury history includes Tommy John surgery that forced him to miss the entire 2012 campaign, but he's been generally healthy since then and has made at least 25 starts in three straight seasons. 

Coming off his most productive year to date, Carrasco has a 6.14 ERA, 16 strikeouts and four walks over 14.2 innings in five appearances this spring. He was roughed up for six runs on nine hits, including two home runs, in 4.2 innings before leaving due to injury—and all that happened on his 31st birthday.

So long as Carrasco is banged up, the onus will be on Mike Clevinger to step up and provide some stability in the back end of the rotation while Corey Kluber and Co. continue to hold down the fort at the top.   

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Carlos Carrasco Exits Game vs. Royals with Foot Injury from Line Drive

Cleveland Indians ace Carlos Carrasco had his spring training interrupted Wednesday when he suffered a foot injury against the Kansas City Royals. 

According to MLB.com's Jordan Bastian, Carrasco left the game with trainers after being hit by a comebacker off the bat of Royals third baseman Cheslor Cuthbert. 

Carrasco's injury history includes Tommy John surgery that forced him to miss the entire 2012 campaign, but he's been generally healthy since then and has made at least 25 starts in three straight seasons. 

Coming off his most productive year to date, Carrasco has a 6.14 ERA, 16 strikeouts and four walks over 14.2 innings in five appearances this spring. He was roughed up for six runs on nine hits, including two home runs, in 4.2 innings before leaving due to injury—and all that happened on his 31st birthday.

So long as Carrasco is banged up, the onus will be on Mike Clevinger to step up and provide some stability in the back end of the rotation while Corey Kluber and Co. continue to hold down the fort at the top.   

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Justin Turner Suffers Broken Wrist Injury; Likely Out Until May

Los Angeles Dodgers third baseman Justin Turner suffered a broken wrist in spring training Monday, per Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times.

Shaikin noted the slugger is "unlikely to return before May" and cited the six weeks Freddie Freeman of the Atlanta Braves and nine weeks George Springer of the Houston Astros missed because of prior broken wrists.

Turner talked about the injury with SportsNet LA:

According to Bob Nightengale of USA Today, Turner broke the wrist when he was hit by a pitch.

This is a significant blow for the Dodgers considering Turner has blossomed into one of Major League Baseball's most feared hitters over the past few seasons.

Last year, the 33-year-old was sensational, as he slashed .322/.415/.530 with 21 home runs and 71 RBI en route to his first All-Star nod.

With Turner banged up, Dodgers manager Dave Roberts will have to tinker with his infield alignment.

Logan Forsythe projects as Turner's most likely replacement at the hot corner, with Chase Utley the favorite to take over Forsythe's starting duties at second base. The versatile Chris Taylor could also move from the outfield to the infield.

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